Top 10 Summer activities in Mandurah

1. Hanging with the friendly locals

Photo Credit: Mandurah Cruises

Mandurah has one of Australia’s healthiest dolphin populations, with over 100 wild bottlenose dolphins calling Mandurah home.  

Get up close and learn all about these beautiful and fascinating creatures on a Dolphin Scenic Cruise with Mandurah Cruises. Or delight in watching them play in the water as you dine at one of Mandurah’s waterfront cafes overlooking Mandjar Bay or the marina.

2. Scooping for crabs in the estuary

Photo Credit: Russell Ord Photography

The iconic blue swimmer crabs are native to Mandurah. Catch them for yourself on a crabbing cruise between December and March or devour them, at one of the many restaurants dotted along the waterfront. Find out more here

3. Hiring a boat to see the luxury canal homes

Photo Credit: Russell Ord Photography

The city is often compared to a modern Venice due to its network of canals. Explore at your own pace with a boat hired from Mandurah Boat & Bike Hire and marvel at the luxury homes as you cruise on by.

4. Spotting the migratory shorebirds in the wetlands.

Photo Credit: Les Imgrund

Declared a Wetlands of International Importance in 1990 by the Ramsar Convention, this diverse and productive ecosystem covers over 26,000 hectares and is comprised of estuaries, lakes, rivers and conservation reserves, including Yalgorup National Park, Lake Mealup Nature Reserve & Lake McLarty Nature Reserve, Austin Bay Nature Reserve and Creery Wetlands Nature Reserve.

It is the largest and most diverse estuarine complex in south west Australia and provides a habitat for thousands of plants and animals. It’s a breeding ground and nursery for crabs, fish, native animals and birds, including quolls and quendas (bandicoots).

The wetlands supports more than 20,000 water birds annually. This includes those that travel the East-Asian Australasian Flyway, a 25,000km bird migration route that stretches across 22 countries from Russia to Australia. Thousands of these migratory birds feed and shelter in the wetlands from October to March. 

Go to www.birdlife.org.au for more information on migratory birds.

Our tip: the best way to discover (or rediscover) what makes these stunning wetlands and the remarkable wildlife so special is on a guided walking tour with Ways to Nature. 

5. Dining on fresh, local seafood by the waterfront

Photo Credit: Russell Ord Photography

With 130 sq km of inland waterways and 60km of coastline you are spoilt for choice when it comes to waterfront dining in Mandurah, most with alfresco areas.

You can enjoy stunning views of Mandjar Bay, Mandurah Ocean Marina, the Dawesville Cut, Murray River and the Indian Ocean at many bars, restaurants and cafés. 

For seafood with a view, visit the award winning Redmanna Waterfront Restaurant overlooking Mandurah Bridge and Mandjar Bay.

At the marina, for quality seafood in a more casual setting try the Oceanic Bar and Grill, Seafood Nation, Oyster Bar, the Local Shack or Sharky’s.

6. Going for a morning paddle or jet-ski tour

Photo Credit: Russell Ord Photography

Zip along the estuary or take to the open ocean on a jet ski from Mandurah. Available for hire, this nautical adventure is great fun, and you can do it alone or with a friend and be joined by dolphins along the way! Book now with the local operators Nautical Adventures or Stag Watersports.

For a more peaceful ride on the water, Peel-Harvey Inlet, Mandurah’s jewel in the crown, or Mandjar Bay are ideal for kayaks and paddle boards.  You can hire them from Star Surf or Mandurah Boat & Bike Hire.

7. Taking a dip at Falcon Bay

Photo Credit: Russell Ord Photography

Much loved by the locals is Falcon Bay, just a bit north of the Dawesville Cut. Northern facing and protected from southerly winds, it’s perfect for beach to spend all day swimming and relaxing by the water. Especially as it also has shady grassed areas, picnic tables, BBQs, a playground and toilet/shower facilities and the popular Falcon Bay Beach Cafe’ nearby.

The calm waters make it a great spot for paddlers too, It also has  a reef area ideal for exploring or snorkelling at high tide and a pontoon offshore in summertime 

Our tip: if you are keen to learn to Stand Up Paddle Board or how to surf, Star Surf has you covered. Offering lessons at Falcon Bay and other nearby beaches.

11 Spinaway Pde, Falcon

Get Directions

more swimming spots….

Our pristine, uncrowded beaches are playgrounds for all ages and interests. With long, uncrowded, sandy beaches stretching from Mandurah to Preston Beach, you’ll be sure to find the perfect beach to suit you.

  • Dolphin Pool is a man-made, sheltered beach by the marina and close to restaurants and accommodation.
  • Town Beach, also near the marina, is a short stroll from the city centre and has a surf life saving lookout operating in summer.
  • Silver Sands extends north of the city and is dog-friendly.
  • San Remo, also north, has a café and is patrolled by Mandurah Surf Life Saving Club in summer.
  • Halls Head (Doddi’s Beach) and Blue Bay are less than 10 minutes south of the city centre with parking, toilets and cafés nearby.
  • Avalon Bay is a little bit further south and are considered two of the best beaches in Mandurah with parking, toilets and cafés nearby.
  • Preston Beach, 45 minutes south of Mandurah is perfect for a holiday with accommodation and a café right by the beach.

Most beaches are suitable for kite-surfing, wind-surfing and jet-skis. Many also have man-made groins that provide shelter and small waves for boogie boarding.

Pyramids, Tims Thicket and Avalon Point are the best spots for surfers and others seeking waves.

For an alternative to the beach, Drakesbrook Weir near Waroona Dam is a very popular spot for swimming and Serpentine Falls in the picturesque Serpentine National Park is the perfect place to cool off on a hot summer’s day.

8. Takeaway fish and chips on the Foreshore

Photo Credit: Russell Ord Photography

It’s the simple pleasures that make Mandurah a seaside town to remember. Grab some fish and chips from Cicerellos or Jetty Fish n Burgers and sit upon the grass on the Mandurah Eastern Foreshore. Enjoy the cool sea breeze and salty air as you look out over the stunning Mandjar Bay.

9. Eating ice cream from Simmos Ice Creamery

Photo Credit: Russell Ord Photography

Simmos Ice Creamery has been a WA  icon for over 25 years. Any visit to Mandurah must include enjoying one of their delicious ice creams while strolling along the Mandurah Eastern Foreshore. 

With 60 yummy flavours to choose from, you might have to have more than one!

10. Getting a photo with the 3D public art

Photo Credit: John Taylor

After making your friends jealous of all the beautiful aquatic, nature and yummy seafood shots of your Mandurah holiday on Instagram, get them laughing again with some funny photos of you with 3D art.

Mandurah Bridge Blue Manna Crab 3D art

At the eastern end of the bridge, right opposite Bar Therapy, a giant blue manna crab is trying to nip people as they walk past.

cnr of Pinjarra Rd and Mandurah Tce

Marine wildlife 3D pavement art

At the other end of the foreshore, just a short stroll away and just outside the Mandurah Visitor Centre are some of Mandurah’s friendly marine life just waiting to have a photo with you. 

Between Mandurah Visitor Centre and Cicerellos, 75 Mandurah Terrace

Blue Gatehouse Pelican 3D Art

Feed the very hungry giant pelican on the Blue Gatehouse wall on the corner of Dolphin Drive and Spinnaker Quays. 

Dolphin Quay Marina, Zephyr Mews, Mandurah Ocean Marina